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By Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie
May 29, 2012
Category: Tips

 

As specialists in pediatric dentistry, Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie -- and their associates and staff --often address parents’ concerns about the oral health of their children. Today, we are sharing information about when to schedule your child’s first dental visit.

We get asked this question a lot. What age is the right age for a child’s first dental checkup? The answer? We recommend a “well-baby” visit by age one, as suggested by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Think, “First birthday, first visit.” We fondly refer to this appointment as our Terrific Toddler visit.

This appointment will enable us to establish a positive relationship with parents and children at a young age so we can get on the road to good oral health habits. We want to identify and manage patients at high risk for tooth decay before it becomes a serious issue.

While the first appointment is generally short and involves very little treatment, it is important for beginning a thorough prevention program and gives the child an opportunity to meet the dentist in a non-threatening way. We always invite parents to hold their child on their lap while our dentist looks inside the child’s mouth. Baby feels secure and we can provide a thorough visual exam.

Prior to the appointment, parents are asked to fill out medical and health information forms about their child. Parents can find the health history form on our website here. A complete history provides us with important information that may relate to your child’s dental development and needs. Questions like Did the baby have a premature birth? Does/did your child take many oral medications? are examples of questions we need answered.

Topics we discuss during the Terrific Toddler visit include:

  • Your child’s dental development and teething progress
  • How best to clean your infant’s mouth
  • Oral habits, such as thumb sucking and pacifier use
  • Diet and snacking habits
  • Potential fluoride needs
  • Your child’s individual risk for tooth decay

Parent education and cooperation is an important part of pediatric oral health care. We look forward to meeting you and your infant in the future.

To schedule your infant’s first appointment, please call Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie at (248) 608-2626.

By Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie
March 29, 2012
Category: Tips

As specialists in pediatric dentistry, Dr. Tracht, Dr. Briskie and their associates and staff often address parents’ concerns regarding the oral health of their children. Today, we are sharing information about how we care for our pediatric patients with special needs.

To us, every child is exceptional, which is why we are happy to cater to all children from infancy through early adulthood. This includes youngsters of pre-cooperative age and those with special needs including physical, mental and emotional challenges.

All of our pediatric dental specialists are highly trained to work with children of all backgrounds. We recommend establishing care with our patients as early as possible so we can be proactive in preventing oral issues and create a mutually beneficial relationship with the patient and caregiver. In fact, we support the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommendation that a child’s first trip to the dentist should be some time after the first tooth appears and by one year. This is especially important for children with special challenges. We can offer tips to parents and caregivers so they can promote good oral health habits at home.

How our office can assist special needs patients:

  • Our "open-style" treatment area promotes a supportive and fun environment with fun items such as Gameboys and headphones for music and stories.
  • We will provide and recommend special oral hygiene aids to assist patients who need them.
  • We welcome caregivers to remain with their child during an appointment and to work in partnership with us.
  • We work closely with the medical community to successfully manage our patients with complex concerns.
  • We comfort our patients as much as possible and show and tell them what we're going to do before we do it to help ease worries and fears. It’s the tried and true “Show, Tell, Do” approach!
  • If a child is not able cooperate for treatment, we can administer mild medications that provide a conscious (awake) sedation. For more complex cases, we can use unconscious sedation in a local hospital with the support of an anesthesiologist.

 

Our work with special needs patients was recently featured on Oakland County Moms, a Michigan-based Web site linking parents to local events and resources. To view the article, click here.

Do you have questions about your child with special needs visiting our office? Give Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie, specialists in pediatric dentistry, a call or schedule an appointment.

Want to learn more? Join us as we share tips on Facebook and Twitter.

By Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie
March 02, 2012
Category: Tips

 

Welcome to Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie’s blog!

As specialists in pediatric dentistry, we often address concerns parents have regarding their children’s oral health. Today, we are sharing information about what kinds of toothpastes are best to keep your little one’s smile strong and bright.

Fact: Tooth brushing tools date back to 3500-3000 BC when the Babylonians and the Egyptians made a brush by fraying the end of a twig.

Thankfully, we’ve come a long way from those days and now actually have a substance to clean our teeth with!

Tooth brushing is crucial for children to maintain good oral health and it is imperative that parents teach their children to brush their teeth at least twice a day. This prevents plaque build-up, which can cause cavities, bad breath, gum problems (gingivitis) and stained teeth.

Since many pediatric dental patients are extremely picky about the tastes they will tolerate, and parents are selective about what they put into their child's mouth, choosing the right toothpaste can be tricky. With so many options for toothpaste, it can be a daunting task to find one that's right for your child. Some flavoring and cleaning additives, such as cinnamon or sodium lauryl sulfate, can be irritating to oral issues and may contribute to canker sores.

What to Look For When Choosing A Toothpaste

When choosing a brand of toothpaste, Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie suggest you make sure to select one that is recommended by the American Dental Association (ADA). This will be stated right on the outside of the box with their familiar seal of approval. The ADA recommends toothpastes that have undergone extensive testing to make sure that they are safe to use and will not cause any harm to teeth. You may also wish to look for toothpaste that is recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), who conduct scientific testing, as well.

It is important to tell your children to spit out toothpaste after brushing to prevent ingestion of too much fluoride; however, childrenwho are at high risk for cavities may benefit from a very small amount of fluoride toothpaste even before they can spit. This option should be considered very carefully though. Drs. Tracht and Briskie can help evaluate your child on an individual basis after a thorough examination and consultation. Remember, it’s always a good guideline to use no more than a "pea size" amount of toothpaste.

No matter what your child’s oral health needs are, there’s likely a toothpaste for you. Happy brushing from Dr. Tracht & Dr. Briskie!

Do you have questions about which toothpaste is best for your children? Give Drs. Tracht and Briskie, specialists in pediatric dentistry, a call or schedule an appointment. See here for more information about what we do and how we can help your child.

Want to learn more? Join us as we share tips on Facebook and Twitter.

By Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie
December 13, 2011
Category: Tips

 

Welcome to Drs. Tracht and Briskie’s blog!

As specialists in pediatric dentistry, we are often asked about concerns parents have regarding their children’s oral health. Today, we are sharing insight on a commonquestion we often hear from parents of our patients:

My child grinds his/her teeth! What should I do?

Bruxism (the formal word for grinding or gnashing of teeth) is seen very commonly in children. Two to three out of every 10 kids will grind their teeth. Bruxism usually occurs at night during sleep, but can be demonstrated throughout the day, too. The good news is most will outgrow it!

Causes

Children's bites are very flexible and therefore subject to change as they grow. Occasionally, children will exhibit an abnormal bite causing them to grind because of the placement of their teeth.

Stress can sometimes be another cause. So any changes in routine such as a test in school or tension with a friend, sibling, or parent may prompt grinding. It’s good to talk to kids about stress.

Drs. Tracht and Briskie mostly see grinding in children younger than 7 years old. A lot of children will stop grinding once their permanent molars erupt. Their permanent teeth “bite” (occlusion) begins to establish itself once those molars erupt. 

Side Effects

Signs to watch for are grinding during sleep, complaints of a sore jaw, especially in the morning, and pain in the jaw when chewing. Usually, it’s more bothersome to other family members because of the nighttime grinding sound! Some parents say they can hear the grinding in a different area of the house from where their child is sleeping.

This habit, continued consciously or unconsciously over a long period of time, can result in excessive wearing of tooth structure. In permanent teeth, and far more commonly in adults, bruxism can lead to periodontal disease (bone loss) and/or a TMJ (temporomandibular joint) disorder, resulting in headaches, facial pain, jaw “clicking” etc.

Treatment

Children usually outgrow the habit with no lasting side effects; treatment is usually not necessary. However, if intervention is needed, bruxism can be diagnosed at a routine dental visit.  Drs. Tracht and Briskie’s treatment may include bite adjustments, or a bite guard appliance.

Do you have questions about your child’s teeth grinding? Give Drs. Tracht and Briskie, specialists in pediatric dentistry, a call or schedule an appointment. See here for more information about what we do and how we can help your child.

Want to learn more? Join us as we share tips on Facebook and Twitter.

By Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie
November 07, 2011
Category: Tips

 

Welcome to Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie’s blog! As specialists in pediatric dentistry, we are often asked about a wide-range of topics that are important considerations to keeping your children healthy.  

Today we’re sharing insight from the pediatric dentist’s perspective on a very common concern for parents of little ones:

Is thumb sucking bad? Can thumb sucking lead to permanent damage?

The answer: It all depends.

It’s not uncommon to see a baby put a variety of things into his or her mouth – a favorite toy, a finger – maybe even a toe. Sucking is a natural reflex for babies and offers a sense of relaxation, comfort or security.

Prolonged sucking habits can interfere with the proper growth of the jaws and tooth alignment. How intensely a child sucks, and the length of time, influence the degree of dental problems. Children who suck their thumb, fingers or pacifier commonly develop problems with their front teeth sticking out too far (from the persistent pressure of sucking), or with the front teeth not able to bite together. Children who rest their thumbs or fingers passively in their mouths will have less distortion than those who suck vigorously.

According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, most children stop thumb sucking between the ages of two and four. However, as pediatric dentists, Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie see some children continue sucking well beyond the preschool years. If your child is still sucking after age 4, it is time to consider taking action.

Should you need to help your child end the habit, Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie recommend these tips approved by the American Dental Association:

  • Praise children for not sucking, instead of scolding them when they are.
  • Children often suck their thumbs when feeling insecure or needing comfort. Focus on correcting the cause of the anxiety and provide comfort to your child.
  • For an older child, involve him or her in choosing the method of stopping.

As pediatric dentists, Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie can offer encouragement to your child and explain the consequences of long term sucking habits.Additionally, our pediatric specialists are happy to offer habit control intervention programs, appliances, including early orthodontic treatment when necessary.

Are pacifiers a better alternative?

Not in all cases. Pacifiers can affect the teeth and jaws the same as fingers or thumbs, but can be more easily controlled. There are some pacifiers that have been designed to cause less bite distortion than others.

Do you have questions about your child’s non-nutritive sucking habit? Give Dr. Tracht and Dr. Briskie, Specialists in Pediatric Dentistry a call or schedule an appointment. See here for more information about what we do and how we can help the little ones you love.

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Thanks for reading!